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Remembering Ernest Hemingway



For six minutes plus a good piece about Hemingway. Good to hear his voice again.

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Ernest Hemingway and Gertrude Stein

Ernest and Hadley had come to Paris in 1922 so they could live more cheaply on Hadley's $8,000 inheritance, and hopefully give Ernest a chance to develop his writing skills and become the great novelist he knew he could, and more importantly, should be. He introduced himself, with the help of Anderson's letter, to Gertrude Stein who lectured him (while her lover and secretary, Alice B. Toklas, fed Hadley tea and cakes in a separate room) on what it was to be a writer, on what it was to be a painter, to be a musician, to be a dancer, to be, to be.

“It's all repetition, Hemingway, all repetition, remember that.”
And Hemingway did remember, and knew, when he looked at Stein's impressive collection of Cezannes, and Monets, and Picassos, that he wanted to write the way they had painted and were painting: with a clarity, and a vision, and with all the colours and the smells and the tastes, and, and, well everything.

The Wives of Ernest Hemingway

In 1920 Ernest Hemingway lived his bachelor life at 1230 North State Street, Chicago, until he was offered an apartment 100 East Chicago Street.
Many of the apartments were occupied by writers, including Hadley Richardson's friend, Kate Smith, who later married John Dos Passos.
Another of the apartments was occupied by the painter, Kenley Smith, and it was when Kate Smith invited Hemingway to a party in Kenley's apartment, that he spotted Hadley Richardson - a young woman he'd seen playing the piano at a recital some years before.
The couple hit it off immediately, and both of them soon realised they had met the person they wanted to marry.
Maybe both saw in the other the renegade in themselves and a kindred spirit. They both had a love of literature, art, and music, and were looking for a secure place to deposit their emotions. But they were also bursting with sexual desires and frustrations.
Hadley was eight years older than Hemingway and a woman who, at first sight, was of …

Ernest Hemingway and F.Scott Fitzgerald meet and Go On A Trip, Paris 1925

In Hemingway's memoir, A Moveable Feast, he describes the first time he met F. Scott Fitzgerald in the Dingo Bar on the rue Delambre where, as Hemingway describes it, "...a very strange thing happened."
As Hemingway was sitting and drinking with some "completely worthless characters," Fitzgerald came in with a tall young man who turned out to be the famous baseball pitcher, Dunc Chaplin. Hemingway was no baseball devotee and had never heard of Chaplin, but recognised Fitzgerald, and took this chance to introduce himself, which went something like this: